Corruption Must Be Tackled ‘at Recruitment Stage’

DENPASAR

The chain of corruption in government needs to be broken at the recruitment stage, according to a senior official.

The assistant deputy for systems development supervision and administrative reform at the Ministry for Administrative and Bureaucratic Reforms, Hendro Witjaksono, said law-enforcement and careful recruitment were among the most important anti-corruption measures.

“If measures for the prevention of corruption are strengthened, of course the incidences will be reduced,” he said.

Witjaksono was in Denpasar on Tuesday to attend a meeting on implementation of good governance and corruption prevention at the governor’s office.

He said law-enforcement had been the main focus of anti-corruption activity in 2011. Stopping the possibility of bribes from entering the civil service was the main aspect of this, he added.

“The chain of corruption usually begins with the recruitment process. Certain elements try to become civil servants through dishonest means, and once they manage to get in office, they pursue corruption as a way to get back what they spent [on bribes during recruitment],” he said.

Stopping the possibility for such practices during recruitment would be the single most effective way of cutting corruption, he said.

“The police, prosecutors and judges are certainly regarded as not entirely clean by the general public, although we have made various efforts to reform the recruitment process,” he said.

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One Response to “Corruption Must Be Tackled ‘at Recruitment Stage’”

  1. Sybille Says:

    “The chain of corruption usually begins with the recruitment process. Certain elements try to become civil servants through dishonest means, and once they manage to get in office, they pursue corruption as a way to get back what they spent [on bribes during recruitment],”

    The sad reality of life in all of Indonesia is that corruption has such a huge negative impact on the community in general.

    When a university educated teacher is asked to pay Rupiah 150 million (yes, that’s correct) to get a job in a local small town high school, the effects are this:

    1. instead of getting a loan to pay the bribe, the young man decided to buy a car, and is now trying to get by doing transport for tourists. He has also bought a sewing machine and sews the uniforms for the local schools.

    2. the money spent on his university education was basically wasted.

    3. it also means that the local children are not receiving the best possible education by the best qualified teachers, but by “teachers” who could afford to pay the bribe.

    4. it also means that these “teachers” need to recoup their original “investment” of Rp150 million, which on an average monthly salary of under rp 2 million, is pretty much impossible. So they do this by giving private lessons which is fine, but they also pass students who should fail a subject, but whos’ parents can afford to pay the fee for such a “pass”.

    There is hardly a facet of daily life which is not effected by corruption. Whether it’s paying the policeman who stops you on the road, to getting an ID card or drivers licence, to actually taking advantage of health care cards, which provide for free medical treatment – YES the scheme does exist, although a huge number of locals are not aware of it, which, of course, begs the question of who is interested in NOT making the relevant information, and subsequently these cards, available to the public.

    Maybe if the name for “corruption” was changed to “theft” it would not be so widely accepted as a fact of life both here in Bali, and in Indonesia as a whole. The people who have the power, perceived or real, are STEALING from the general population, and like most crime, the real cost is paid by those who can least afford it.

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