“Mecaru” Ritual Maintain Human Environment Harmony

Mecaru ceremony, which is also called Butha Yadnya is a ritual to maintain relationship between human and environment.

Meanwhile, “caru” means beautiful or in harmony (Samhita Swara scripture).

Mecaru is conducted one day before Nyepi, which is on new moon (tilem).

One day before Nyepi, which is “sasih kesanga” (the ninth month). At that time Hindus people in Bali carry out Butha Yadnya ceremony that is held at the four-junction and at their own home.

For the ceremony people make caru or an offering based on their ability. Pecaruan is a purification or pemarisudha of Butha Kala and all bad things so that it can be eliminated and become holy again.

The ritual is carried out at each house, the offering prepared consists of five-coloured rice, brumbun (colorful) chicken and “tetabuhan” arak.

The worship is dedicated for sang Bhuta Raja, Bhuta Kala and Bhatara Kala so they don’t disturb human.

Whereas in fact Bhuta Yadnya cares five features of nature, which is called panca maha butha (soil, water, fire, air, and ether). If those five features of nature work naturally the plants will grow.

Plants are the basic food material for animal and human. If the harmony of those five features of nature is destroyed, its function will also damage.

Mecaru ceremony aims at implanting wisdom and spiritual values to human so they will always maintain the harmony of nature, environment, and everything inside it (universe knowledge).

Meanwhile, the importance of mecaru ceremony is the human’s obligation to care of environment, which is symbolized as the God’s body in forming the universe.

The Almighty God has given many things to human so it could be used wisely, but above all Hyang Widhi entrust the nature on human to be protected and cared.

From the explanation above, the existence of universe and time is very important and has a great value. If we destroy the environment (nature), in the future we will also be destroyed by the nature through a continuous natural disaster.

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